Category

History of Antisemitism in Hungary
  Miklos Horthy was a self-proclaimed lifelong anti-Semite, and the Christian nationalist and authoritarian ideology of the state system he enacted reflected personal and deep-seated anti-Semitic prejudices. Shortly after Horthy came to power and years before the Nazis led Germany, Hungary enacted his so-called Numerus-Claus Act of 1920, effectively ending the legal equality of Jews...
  When Nazi Germany handed over power to The Arrow Cross on October 15, Soviet forces occupied Debrecen and Szeged, and fighting continued on the Tisza River. Ferenc Saalasi’s main goal as the leader of the nation was to get Hungary to enter the war, believing that the “secret weapon” Hitler promised would turn the...
  The First Jewish Law, submitted on April 8, 1938, limited the percentage of Jews to 20 percent in the free professions, in administrative jobs, and as employees of commercial enterprises. commercial and industrial. Opposition parties strongly attacked the draft; however, it was ratified by both houses of parliament. The Second Jewish Law was promulgated...
  About 10,000 soldiers of the “Israeli Faith” died on the battlefield, but traditional anti-Semitism continued to grow after World War I.  Hungarian Jews were accused of obstructing the military, cowardice, the black market, and fraud in military supplies. Controversy over the “Jewish question” flared up in modern newspapers. The most influential was Huszadik Század...
  Tiszaeszlar (In Hungarian Tiszaeszlár) is a town in northeast Hungary, close to the city of Nyiregyhaza. The city became infamous in reference to a blood libel there that drew popular opinion throughout Europe at the time and has become the topic of stormy agitation in Hungary for many years. Its effects were disastrously clear...